Author Topic: Excerpts from users of MapScenes and Leica Geosystems laser scanners  (Read 17896 times)

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“…Data from the Leica laser scanner is automatically imported into Leica Cyclone as I’m scanning (a crash or crime scene). During the scanning, I’m actually seeing the point cloud populate. Cyclone is on a separate laptop or desktop computer and can control the scanner. I set the parameters on my laptop so that scanning can be accomplished. Also, the beauty of this process is that if, as I’m looking at the scanned data, I’ve missed something, I can go back and scan it. Cyclone takes all that data and presents it in one viewable atmosphere that the user can navigate via multiple views.”
-Detective David DeLeeuw, Ocean County, New Jersey, Sheriff’s Office Crime Investigation Unit



“…We use MapScenes to capture data and produce 2D line drawings because it’s quick, effective and easy. We also use MapScenes to create a 3D model for accident reconstruction and to perform analysis. MapScenes is very effective for doing this.”
-Jason Fries, CEO, 3D-Forensic, San Francisco, California 



“…We had a week’s worth of training on the MapScenes software. At first, when I was told it would be this long, it seemed like a lot of time. But there are a lot of capabilities (in the software). There are so many things we can use it for and that are beneficial for our crime scenes, such as a 3D view. We made a 3D measurement of a car where there was homicide in it. There were bullet holes in the doors and windows, and a victim in the car. Using the software, we could insert trajectory rods (for the bullets) and make the drawing in 3D. You can bring all of this up on the computer, print it out, and view in a courtroom. This is one of the aspects that really stood out.”

 “…There are so many things we can use MapScenes for, and that are beneficial for our crime scenes, such as a 3D view. We made a 3D measurement of a car where there was a homicide in it. There were bullet holes in the doors and windows, and a victim in the car. Using the software, we could insert trajectory rods (for the bullets) and make the drawing in 3D. You can bring all of this up on the computer, print it out, view in a courtroom.”
-Detective Sgt. Pete Thompson, King County, California, Sheriff’s Office